Significant progress has been made in restoring water supply. As of 4pm on Wednesday:
 
  • 25,000 people are without water down from a peak of 109,000
  • 2,000 people are on water supplies that are at risk of running out of water, down from a peak of 260,000
  • Counties worst affected by the outages are Cork, Waterford and Wexford.
While progress has been significant and is continuing, it is clear that some of the very smaller schemes with fewer than 1,000 people will take longer to get back on track and these more remote areas will take longer to get power back.
 
Some of these smaller water treatment plants are not suitable for generators so Irish Water is coordinating with the local authorities to ensure that water is provided for the local population with tankers.
 
We also have a number of wastewater treatment plants and a significant number of sewage pumping stations where power failure is resulting in discharge of untreated or partially treated wastewater to receiving waters.  As with drinking water, the number of installations affected are being reduced as power supplies are restored. A total of 148 plants were affected, the majority in Cork. Of these Irish Water has 104 back on line and functioning properly, either by the restoration of power, the use of generators or by tankering waste away. We are now working on the remaining plants, to move generators to them and put in other measures. Irish Water are in close contact with the EPA and Inland Fisheries where discharges have occurred.
 
Irish Water would like to thank the ESB Networks for all their assistance during this storm event and where possible prioritising the restoration of power supplies to the water and wastewater treatment plants.
 
Irish Water is grateful for the commitment of its staff and those of the local authorities who are working to address the issues arising from the storm as quickly as possible. We are also grateful for the patience and forbearance of our customers during this event.

Irish Water is continuing to work with the ESB and the local authorities in Carlow and Kilkenny to restore water supply to all customers in the wake of Storm Ophelia.

At its peak there were 109,000 customers across the country without water. This has now been reduced to less than 24,000.

Water supply has now been restored to all customers in Kilkenny and there are approximately 75 people in Carlow without water.

In these locations where it is taking longer to restore power to allow for the restoration of the water supply, tankers are being deployed to assist the communities. Tankered water supplies are being provided in Bilboa and Tynock and a temporary supply has been provided at Craan Kildavin until power can be restored.

 

 

 

In Cavan the Kingscourt Water Treatment Plant suffered a power outage. Irish Water, working in partnership with Cavan County Council, had contingency plans in place in the lead up to the storm and there was sufficient water storage in the reservoir to ensure a continuation of supply for customers. Veolia who operate the treatment for Irish Water attended the plant and rectified the fault at 8.30pm on Monday night.

Irish Water is continuing to work with the ESB and Cork County Council to restore water supply to all customers in Co Cork in the wake of Storm Ophelia.

Cork and Waterford were the counties most badly impacted by outages due to the storm. At its peak there were 109,000 customers across the country without water. This has now been reduced to less than 24,000, approximately 12,000 of whom are in Cork.

To meet the demands of those plants without power Irish Water, working with Cork County Council, has been sourcing generators and putting them in place to get treatment plants back up and running. 

At present, 26 generators are being used to power water treatment plants across the Southern region, serving a population of 90,000.

In the past 24 hours, supply has been restored in a large number of areas in Cork, including Cobh, Leap, Cloyne, Kealkill and Doneraile.

 

 

In Donegal, Irish Water, working in partnership with Donegal County Council, had contingency plans in place in the lead up to the storm and can confirm that there were no issues with our water and waste water services as a result of the storm.

Irish Water, working in partnership with Galway County Council, would like to advise customers that all of our treatment plants have full power restored and it is business as usual.

Irish Water would like to thank ESB Networks locally for their hard work in restoring power to our plants and helping us to ensure that the effects of Storm Ophelia on our customers were kept to a minimum in Co Galway.

Irish Water would also like to thank the water services staff in both Galway City and County Councils for their hard work and diligence during this storm event.

Irish Water would like to advise customers that the power has been restored at the Galmoy Water Treatment Plant. Rathdowney is supplied from the Galmoy Public Water Supply Scheme in Kilkenny. The water supply to customers will be restored throughout the day as the water level in the reservoir rises. A water tanker is located at the Square in Rathdowney and it will remain in place until a normal water service is restored to customers.

The power supply was restored to the Drim water treatment plant in Mountrath earlier today. As the reservoir refills water will be restored to all properties in Roundwood. A normal water service is being supplied to Mountrath.

Power has been restored to all other water treatment plants in County Laois and the water supply has been restored to customers.

Irish Water is grateful for the commitment of its staff and those of the local authorities and the ESB who are working to address the issues arising from the storm as quickly as possible. We are also grateful for the patience and forbearance of our customers during this event.

We will continue to provide updates to customers throughout the day. If customers have issues with their water supply please view our supply and service map, visit twitter at @IWCare or call us on 1850 278 278. Our customer care helpline is open 24/7.

In Leitrim the Carrick on Shannon Water Treatment Plant suffered a power outage. Irish Water, working in partnership with Leitrim County Council, had contingency plans in place in the lead up to the storm and there was sufficient water storage in the reservoir to ensure a continuation of supply for customers. Due to the hard work of ESB Networks locally the power outage was fixed by approximately 7pm on Monday night and the treatment plant returned to normal production.

In Limerick, a number of customers in the county, are continuing to experience water outages due to power cuts associated with Storm Ophelia. Affected areas include Hospital, Caherconlish, Doon, Oola, Castletown/Ballyagran, Athlacca, Pallasgreen, Kilteely, Anglesboro and Ballylanders.

Irish Water is working with Limerick City and County Council to restore these supplies as quickly as possible. Where it is going to take longer to get power back, generators are being brought in where possible and water tankers will be being deployed to assist affected communities. Tankers are currently on site in Ballylanders and Doon. 

While the water supplied from tankers is treated, customers are reminded to boil the water before consumption as a precautionary measure.
 
We would ask that customers who have a water supply would conserve their water.

 

In Mayo, during yesterday morning and prior to the storm reaching the county, there was a power outage in the Cong area which affected the waste water pumping station. The station was out of commission for a short while but was back on line within hours without any impact on customers.

Irish Water, working in partnership with Mayo County Council, had contingency plans in place in the lead up to the storm and can confirm that there were no issues with our water services as a result of the storm.

 

Irish Water, working in partnership with Meath County Council, would like to advise customers that all of our treatment plants have full power restored and it is business as usual.

Irish Water would like to thank ESB Networks locally for their hard work in restoring power to our plants and helping us to ensure that the effects of Storm Ophelia on our customers were kept to a minimum in Co Meath.

Irish Water would also like to thank the water services staff in both Meath County Council for their hard work and diligence during this storm event.

In Monaghan the Clones Water Treatment Plant suffered a power outage due to Storm Ophelia. Irish Water, working in partnership with Monaghan County Council, had contingency plans in place in the lead up to the storm and there was sufficient water storage in the reservoir to ensure a continuation of supply for  customers.  Due to the hard work of ESB Networks locally the power outage was fixed by approximately 9pm on Monday night and the treatment plant returned to normal productio

Irish Water would like to advise customers that there is no power to the water treatment plant in Coolderry. The water supply is interrupted to 73 customers in Coolderry. The ESB are currently on site and it is expected that power will be restored to the plant this evening. 

Power has been restored to the Toberdaly Water Treatment Plant in Rhode and all water pressure boosting stations in the network. The reservoir is currently refilling and a normal water supply is returning to customers.

Power has been restored to all other water treatment plants in County Offaly and the water supply has been restored to customers.

Irish Water is grateful for the commitment of its staff and those of the local authorities and the ESB who are working to address the issues arising from the storm as quickly as possible. We are also grateful for the patience and forbearance of our customers during this event.

We will continue to provide updates to customers throughout the day. If customers have issues with their water supply please view our supply and service map, visit twitter at @IWCare or call us on 1850 278 278. Our customer care helpline is open 24/7. 

Irish Water, working in partnership with Roscommon County Council, would like to advise customers that full power has been restored to the Ballinlough-Loughglynn water treatment plant. As a result the plant is back in full operation and the reservoir has been refilled. A water tanker that was supplying an alternative source for customers without a water supply has been stood down.

Irish Water would like to thank ESB Networks locally for their hard work in restoring power to our plants and helping us to ensure that the effects of Storm Ophelia on our customers were kept to a minimum in Co Roscommon.

Irish Water would also like to thank the water services staff in Roscommon County Council for their hard work and diligence during this storm event.

A thank you is also extended to Mayo County Council for supplying the water tanker at short notice and for assisting us in the Ballinlough-Loughglynn area.

In Sligo, Irish Water, working in partnership with Sligo County Council, had contingency plans in place in the lead up to the storm and can confirm that there were no issues with our water and waste water services as a result of the storm.

Waterford and Cork were the counties most badly impacted by the outages due to the storm. At its peak there were 109,000 customers across the country without water. This has now been reduced to less than 25,000, approximately 2,800 of whom are in Waterford.
In the past 24 hours, supply has been restored in a number of areas, including Ardmore, Ballylaneen, Grange and Modeligo.

To meet the demands of those plants without power Irish Water, working with Waterford City and County Council, has been sourcing generators and putting them in place to get treatment plants back up and running. A generator is currently being installed in Tallow and it is expected that water supply will begin to return there by the morning. 

There are 30 schemes still experiencing disruptions across the county. In locations where it is taking longer to restore water supply, tankers are being deployed to assist the communities.  View tanker locations here

 

Irish Water is continuing to work with the ESB and Wexford County Council to restore water supply to all customers in the wake of Storm Ophelia. 

At its peak there were 109,000 customers across the country without water. This has now been reduced to less than 25,000, approximately 7,200 of whom are in Co Wexford.
In the past 24 hours, supply has been restored in a number of general areas, including Bunclody, Kilmuckridge and Gorey.

To meet the demands of those plants without power Irish Water, working with Wexford County Council, has been sourcing generators and putting them in place to get treatment plants back up and running. 

There are five schemes still experiencing disruptions across the county. In locations where it is taking longer to restore water supply, tankers are being deployed to assist the communities. View tanker locations here

 

Power has been restored to the Knockanarrigan Water Treatment Plant. The water supply will be restored to customers as the network recharges. A water tanker will remain in place at the Post Office in Knockanarrigan until full service is restored to all customers.

Due to a power outage at the water treatment plant in Kilballyowen (Aughrim), the water supply to approximately 21 customers in Kilballyowen (Aughrim) has been disrupted. A water tanker is in place at Hazelhill Housing Estate, Annacurra. Customers must bring their own containers to avail of the water from the tankers and are advised that water must be boiled before consumption as a precaution.

A power outage is also impacting the Rathdangan Water Treatment Plant. Currently customers do have a water supply in this area but the water level in the reservoir is depleting. We ask customers in Rathdangan to conserve their water supply for the foreseeable future until power has been restored to the plant.

Cavan, Cork, Donegal, Galway, Laois, Leitrim, Limerick, Mayo, Meath, Monaghan, Offaly, Roscommon, Sligo, Waterford, Wexford, Wicklow

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