Crews working to lift Boil Water Notice for customers in Batterstown as soon as possible

22 August 2022

Information below is relevant until further updates appear here or on our Supply and Service Updates section.

Irish Water is working with Meath County Council to lift the Boil Water Notice for customers in Batterstown as quickly as possible with a project to upgrade the water supply underway.

The Boil Water Notice was imposed as a precaution on 13 December 2021 to protect the health of 96 customers supplied by Batterstown Public Water Supply following a Bromate exceedance in the water supply. The bromate exceedance was caused by a combination of disinfection methods at the plant combined with naturally-occurring bromide in the source water. To reduce the impact on customers while continuing to protect public health, Irish Water and Meath County Council undertook extensive remedial works at the treatment plant which enabled the Boil Water Notice to replace a Do Not Consume Notice which had been in place since 16 September 2021.

The works involve the construction of over 1.6km of new water mains and ancillary works linking Batterstown to Dunshaughlin Water Treatment Plant, replacing the local water supply and providing customers with a safer and more secure water supply.

The project, which is being prioritised by Irish Water, is expected to be completed before the end of the year. Following a commissioning phase to ensure optimal standards have been achieved as a result of the works, Irish Water and Meath County Council will then consult with the HSE with a view to lifting the notice. In the meantime, all customers on this supply are advised to boil water before use until further notice. 

Michael Cunniffe, Asset Operations Lead with Irish Water, said: “We acknowledge the impact of the Boil Water Notice on the community of Batterstown. Irish Water would like to reassure impacted customers that our drinking water compliance and operational experts are prioritising a project to upgrade the water supply with a view to removing the Boil Water Notice as quickly and as safely as possible in consultation and agreement with the HSE".

Michael added: “Public health is Irish Water’s number one priority and this Boil Water Notice has been put in place as a precaution to protect customers." 

Where risks to water quality are identified through Irish Water’s enhanced testing and monitoring programme, Boil Water Notices are issued in order to safeguard public health. In all instances immediate action is taken to address the cause of the issue in order to lift the notice as quickly as possible, in agreement with the HSE.”

Vulnerable customers who have registered with Irish Water receive direct communication on this Boil Water Notice and are reminded that the water is safe to consume once boiled. Those who have concerns should contact our customer care team on 1800 278 278.

Customers can check if they are impacted by this Boil Water Notice by visiting our Water Quality page and entering their property’s Eircode in the search bar. 

Water must be boiled for:

  • Drinking
  • Drinks made with water
  • Preparation of salads and similar foods, which are not cooked prior to eating
  • Brushing of teeth
  • Making of ice - discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges. Make ice from cooled boiled water.

What actions should be taken:

  • Use water prepared for drinking when preparing foods that will not be cooked (e.g. washing salads)
  • Water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing and flushing of toilets but not for brushing teeth or gargling
  • Boil water by bringing to a vigorous, rolling boil (e.g. with an automatic kettle) and allow to cool. Cover and store in a refrigerator or cold place. Water from the hot tap is not safe to drink. Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink
  • Caution should be taken when bathing children to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water
  • Prepare infant feeds with water that has been brought to the boil once and cooled. Do not use water that has been re-boiled several times. If bottled water is used for the preparation of infant feeds it should be boiled once and cooled. If you are using bottled water for preparing baby food, be aware that some natural mineral water may have high sodium content. The legal limit for sodium in drinking water is 200mg per litre. Check the label on the bottled water to make sure the sodium or `Na' is not greater than 200mg per litre. If it is, then it is advisable to use a different type of bottled water. If no other water is available, then use this water for as short a time as possible. It is important to keep babies hydrated.

Great care should be taken with boiled water to avoid burns and scalds as accidents can easily happen, especially with children.

Updates will be available on the Supply and Service Updates section of our website including a map of the affected area, on Twitter @IWCare and via our customer care helpline, open 24/7 on 1800 278 278. Customers are advised to set their location on the Irish Water website to view updates specific to their water supply. Further information in relation to the boil water notice is available from the Boil Water Notice section of our website.

Previous Updates

Irish Water, working in partnership with Meath County Council, has replaced the Do Not Consume Notice for customers supplied by Batterstown Public Water Supply with a Boil Water Notice with immediate effect. The notice was changed in consultation with the HSE following extensive remedial works at the treatment plant and to reduce the impact on customers while continuing to protect public health. The EPA have been notified of the change in notice.

The Boil Water Notice replaces the Do Not Consume Notice, which has been in place since Thursday 16 September, to continue to protect the health of 96 customers supplied by Batterstown Public Water Supply following a Bromate exceedance in the water supply. The bromate was caused by a combination of disinfection methods at the plant. In order to return it to compliant levels, one of the disinfection processes has been temporarily taken offline and enabled the Do Not Consume Notice to be changed to a Boil Water Notice.

All customers of this supply can now drink their tap water provided it is brought to a vigorous, rolling boil and then allowed to cool before consumption until further notice. Irish Water would like to remind the public to continue to follow public health advice on handwashing and hygiene. Irish Water advises that the water remains suitable for this purpose and boiling the water is not required for handwashing.

Bottled water will no longer be delivered to effected properties.

Michael Cunniffe, Regional Operations Lead with Irish Water, said: “Irish Water acknowledges the impact the Do Not Consume Notice had on the local community. Following the successful completion of remedial works we are able to reduce this to a Boil water Notice which will relieve some of the impact on customers. Customers can now consume their tap water provided it is boiled and cooled. We would like to reassure impacted customers that our drinking water compliance and operational experts are continuing works to remove the Boil Water Notice as quickly and as safely as possible. We would ask customers who have concerns to contact our customer care team on 1800 278 278. The water is safe to use for handwashing and personal hygiene and all customers on this water supply scheme should continue to follow public health advice on handwashing at this time.

Irish Water's primary focus is the protection of public health. We would like to reassure our customers that Irish Water’s drinking water compliance and operational experts are working in partnership with Meath County Council to lift the Boil Water Notice as quickly and as safely as possible, in consultation and agreement with the HSE. Works will continue during Q1 2022 and we will provide a progress update at the end of Q1.

Boil Water Notice advice

Water must be boiled for:

  • Drinking
  • Drinks made with water
  • Preparation of salads and similar foods, which are not cooked prior to eating
  • Brushing of teeth
  • Making of ice - discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges. Make ice from cooled boiled water

What actions should be taken:

  • Use water prepared for drinking when preparing foods that will not be cooked (e.g. washing salads)
  • Water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing and flushing of toilets but not for brushing teeth or gargling. It is important to continue to follow the HSE guidance when collecting water including social distancing and hand hygiene.
  • Boil water by bringing to a vigorous, rolling boil (e.g. with an automatic kettle) and allow to cool. Cover and store in a refrigerator or cold place. Water from the hot tap is not safe to drink. Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink
  • Caution should be taken when bathing children to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water
  • Prepare infant feeds with water that has been brought to the boil once and cooled. Do not use water that has been re-boiled several times. If bottled water is used for the preparation of infant feeds it should be boiled once and cooled. If you are using bottled water for preparing baby food, be aware that some natural mineral water may have high sodium content. The legal limit for sodium in drinking water is 200mg per litre. Check the label on the bottled water to make sure the sodium or `Na' is not greater than 200mg per litre. If it is, then it is advisable to use a different type of bottled water. If no other water is available, then use this water for as short a time as possible. It is important to keep babies hydrated.
  • If you have pets and are concerned about the impact of providing mains water while this BWN is in place, you should ask your local vet for advice
  • Great care should be taken with boiled water to avoid burns and scalds as accidents can easily happen, especially with children.

Water for animals 

Pets

It is a good idea to boil drinking water and let it cool before giving to your pet.

Livestock

A Boil Water Notice is imposed to protect human health. If you have concerns regarding your animals drinking water that is subject to a Boil Water Notice then you should consult your vet. Outdoor animals, such as cattle and horses, are exposed to bacteria on a daily basis that is vastly in excess of that experienced by humans.

Further information on using water during a Boil Water Notice can be found on the Boil Water Notice section of our website.
 
Irish Water is directly contacting registered vulnerable customers to advise them of the change in notice in adherence with current HSE advice. We would ask vulnerable customers or those who have concerns about leaving their homes during the current pandemic to contact our customer care team, open 24/7, on 1800 278 278.  

We will continue to provide updates as information becomes available. Updates will be available on the Supply and Service Updates section of our website, on Twitter @IWCare and via our customer care helpline, open 24/7 on 1800 278 278.

Irish Water and Meath County Council would like to remind customers supplied by Batterstown Public Water Scheme that the Do Not Consume Notice issued on Thursday 16 September remains in place until further notice.

The Do Not Consume Notice was placed as a precaution to protect approximately 96 customers as a result of a Bromate exceedance in the water supply.

Customers in this area are reminded that the water is not safe for consumption or the preparation of foods, but is safe for hygiene and use in washing machines and dishwashers. It is especially important that mains drinking water is not given to bottle fed infants. Irish Water would like to remind the public to continue to follow public health advice on handwashing and hygiene.

We would like to reassure our customers that Irish Water’s drinking water compliance and operational experts are working in partnership with Meath County Council to lift the Do Not Consume Notice as quickly and as safely as possible, in consultation and agreement with the HSE. The EPA have been notified of the Do Not Consume Notice.

Please note this is not a Boil Water Notice. Boiling the water will not reduce Bromate levels and is therefore not a suitable measure to make the water safe to consume. This notice does not apply to other areas or water schemes in Co Meath.

Impacted customers have been directly notified.  An alternative water supply is being provided to all customers on an on-going basis and bottled water is being delivered to vulnerable customers who are registered on this supply, in adherence with current HSE advice.

Updates will be available on the Water Supply Updates section of the Irish Water website and via Twitter @IWCare. Customers can also set their location on the Irish Water website to view local updates specific to their water and wastewater supply or contact our customer care helpline, open 24/7, on 1800 278 278.

Michael Cunniffe, Irish Water, said: “Irish Water and Meath County Council understand the inconvenience caused as a result of this Do Not Consume Notice and apologise to all customers affected. Public health is our number one priority and it is important that people adhere to this Do Not Consume Notice. We will continue to work closely with Meath County Council with a view to lifting the notice as quickly and as safely as possible. Irish Water’s priority is the provision of safe, clean drinking water and safeguarding water supply for the future, is a vital focus.”

 
Public Health Advice:

This water should NOT be used for:

  • Drinking
  • Drinks made with water
  • Food preparation, washing or cooking of food
  • Brushing teeth
  • Making ice
  • In particular, children under 12 months old should not drink this water.
  • This water should not be used for making up infant formula for bottled fed infants. An alternative source of water should be used. Bottled water can also be used to make up infant formula. All bottled water, with the exception of natural mineral water, is regulated to the same standard as drinking water. It is best not to use bottled water labelled as ‘Natural Mineral Water’ as it can have high levels of sodium (salt) and other minerals, although it rarely does. ‘Natural Mineral Water’ can be used if no other water is available, for as short a time as possible, as it is important to keep babies hydrated.
  • If bottled water is used to make up infant formula it should be boiled once (rolling boil for 1 minute), and cooled in the normal way.
  • Ready-to-use formula that does not need added water can also be used.
  • Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink.
  • Caution should be taken when bathing infants to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water.
  • Discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges.

What can you use mains water for:

  • The water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing, flushing toilets, laundry and washing of utensils.

 Irish Water continues to work at this time with our Local Authority partners, contractors and others to safeguard the health and well-being of both staff and the public and to ensure the continuity of critical drinking water and wastewater services.

Irish Water and Meath County Council would like to remind customers supplied by Batterstown Public Water Scheme that the Do Not Consume Notice issued on Thursday 16 September remains in place until further notice.

The Do Not Consume Notice was placed as a precaution to protect approximately 96 customers as a result of a Bromate exceedance in the water supply.

Customers in this area are reminded that the water is not safe for consumption or the preparation of foods, but is safe for hygiene and use in washing machines and dishwashers. It is especially important that mains drinking water is not given to bottle fed infants. Irish Water would like to remind the public to continue to follow public health advice on handwashing and hygiene.

We would like to reassure our customers that Irish Water’s drinking water compliance and operational experts are working in partnership with Meath County Council to lift the Do Not Consume Notice as quickly and as safely as possible, in consultation and agreement with the HSE. The EPA have been notified of the Do Not Consume Notice.

Please note this is not a Boil Water Notice. Boiling the water will not reduce Bromate levels and is therefore not a suitable measure to make the water safe to consume. This notice does not apply to other areas or water schemes in Co Meath.

Impacted customers have been directly notified.  An alternative water supply is being provided to all customers on an on-going basis and bottled water is being delivered to vulnerable customers who are registered on this supply, in adherence with current HSE advice.

For queries regarding this Do Not Consume Notice, customers should contact Irish Water directly on our customer care helpline, open 24/7, on 1800 278 278. Updates will be available on the Water Supply Updates section of the Irish Water website and via Twitter @IWCare. Customers can also set their location on the Irish Water website to view local updates specific to their water and wastewater supply.

Michael Cunniffe, Irish Water, said: “Irish Water and Meath County Council understand the inconvenience caused as a result of this Do Not Consume Notice and apologise to all customers affected. Public health is our number one priority and it is important that people adhere to this Do Not Consume Notice. We will continue to work closely with Meath County Council with a view to lifting the notice as quickly and as safely as possible. Irish Water’s priority is the provision of safe, clean drinking water and safeguarding water supply for the future, is a vital focus.
 
Public Health Advice:

This water should NOT be used for:

  • Drinking
  • Drinks made with water
  • Food preparation, washing or cooking of food
  • Brushing teeth
  • Making ice
  • In particular, children under 12 months old should not drink this water.
  • This water should not be used for making up infant formula for bottled fed infants. An alternative source of water should be used. Bottled water can also be used to make up infant formula. All bottled water, with the exception of natural mineral water, is regulated to the same standard as drinking water. It is best not to use bottled water labelled as ‘Natural Mineral Water’ as it can have high levels of sodium (salt) and other minerals, although it rarely does. ‘Natural Mineral Water’ can be used if no other water is available, for as short a time as possible, as it is important to keep babies hydrated.
  • If bottled water is used to make up infant formula it should be boiled once (rolling boil for 1 minute), and cooled in the normal way.
  • Ready-to-use formula that does not need added water can also be used.
  • Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink.
  • Caution should be taken when bathing infants to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water.
  • Discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges.

What can you use mains water for:

  • The water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing, flushing toilets, laundry and washing of utensils. 

Irish Water continues to work at this time with our Local Authority partners, contractors and others to safeguard the health and well-being of both staff and the public and to ensure the continuity of critical drinking water and wastewater services.

Irish Water and Meath County Council would like to remind customers supplied by Batterstown Public Water Scheme that the Do Not Consume Notice issued on Thursday 16 September remains in place until further notice.

The Do Not Consume Notice was placed as a precaution to protect approximately 96 customers as a result of a Bromate exceedance in the water supply.

Customers in this area are reminded that the water is not safe for consumption or the preparation of foods, but is safe for hygiene and use in washing machines and dishwashers. It is especially important that mains drinking water is not given to bottle fed infants. Irish Water would like to remind the public to continue to follow public health advice on handwashing and hygiene.

We would like to reassure our customers that Irish Water’s drinking water compliance and operational experts are working in partnership with Meath County Council to lift the Do Not Consume Notice as quickly and as safely as possible, in consultation and agreement with the HSE. The EPA have been notified of the Do Not Consume Notice.

Please note this is not a Boil Water Notice. Boiling the water will not reduce Bromate levels and is therefore not a suitable measure to make the water safe to consume. This notice does not apply to other areas or water schemes in Co Meath.

Impacted customers have been directly notified.  An alternative water supply is being provided to all customers on an on-going basis and bottled water is being delivered to vulnerable customers who are registered on this supply, in adherence with current HSE advice.

For queries regarding this Do Not Consume Notice, customers should contact Irish Water directly on our customer care helpline, open 24/7, on 1800 278 278. Updates will be available on the Supply and Service Updates section of the our website and via Twitter @IWCare. Customers can also set their location on our website to view local updates specific to their water and wastewater supply.

Michael Cunniffe, Irish Water, said: “Irish Water and Meath County Council understand the inconvenience caused as a result of this Do Not Consume Notice and apologise to all customers affected. Public health is our number one priority and it is important that people adhere to this Do Not Consume Notice. We will continue to work closely with Meath County Council with a view to lifting the notice as quickly and as safely as possible. Irish Water’s priority is the provision of safe, clean drinking water and safeguarding water supply for the future, is a vital focus.

Public Health Advice:

This water should NOT be used for:

  • Drinking
  • Drinks made with water
  • Food preparation, washing or cooking of food
  • Brushing teeth
  • Making ice
  • In particular, children under 12 months old should not drink this water.
  • This water should not be used for making up infant formula for bottled fed infants. An alternative source of water should be used. Bottled water can also be used to make up infant formula. All bottled water, with the exception of natural mineral water, is regulated to the same standard as drinking water. It is best not to use bottled water labelled as ‘Natural Mineral Water’ as it can have high levels of sodium (salt) and other minerals, although it rarely does. ‘Natural Mineral Water’ can be used if no other water is available, for as short a time as possible, as it is important to keep babies hydrated.
  • If bottled water is used to make up infant formula it should be boiled once (rolling boil for 1 minute), and cooled in the normal way.
  • Ready-to-use formula that does not need added water can also be used.
  • Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink.
  • Caution should be taken when bathing infants to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water.
  • Discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges.

What can you use mains water for:

  • The water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing, flushing toilets, laundry and washing of utensils.

Irish Water continues to work at this time with our Local Authority partners, contractors and others to safeguard the health and well-being of both staff and the public and to ensure the continuity of critical drinking water and wastewater services.

Irish Water and Meath County Council would like to remind customers supplied by Batterstown Public Water Scheme that the Do Not Consume Notice issued on Thursday 16 September remains in place until further notice.

The Do Not Consume Notice was placed as a precaution to protect approximately 96 customers as a result of a Bromate exceedance in the water supply.

Customers in this area are reminded that the water is not safe for consumption or the preparation of foods, but is safe for hygiene and use in washing machines and dishwashers. It is especially important that mains drinking water is not given to bottle fed infants. Irish Water would like to remind the public to continue to follow public health advice on handwashing and hygiene.

We would like to reassure our customers that Irish Water’s drinking water compliance and operational experts are working in partnership with Meath County Council to lift the Do Not Consume Notice as quickly and as safely as possible, in consultation and agreement with the HSE. The EPA have been notified of the Do Not Consume Notice.

Please note this is not a Boil Water Notice. Boiling the water will not reduce Bromate levels and is therefore not a suitable measure to make the water safe to consume. This notice does not apply to other areas or water schemes in Co Meath.

Impacted customers have been directly notified.  An alternative water supply is being provided to all customers on an on-going basis and bottled water is being delivered to vulnerable customers who are registered on this supply, in adherence with current HSE advice.

For queries regarding this Do Not Consume Notice, customers should contact Irish Water directly on our customer care helpline, open 24/7, on 1800 278 278. Updates will be available on the Supply and Service Updates section of the our website and via Twitter @IWCare. Customers can also set their location on our website to view local updates specific to their water and wastewater supply.

Michael Cunniffe, Irish Water, said: “Irish Water and Meath County Council understand the inconvenience caused as a result of this Do Not Consume Notice and apologise to all customers affected. Public health is our number one priority and it is important that people adhere to this Do Not Consume Notice. We will continue to work closely with Meath County Council with a view to lifting the notice as quickly and as safely as possible. Irish Water’s priority is the provision of safe, clean drinking water and safeguarding water supply for the future, is a vital focus.

Public Health Advice:

This water should NOT be used for:

  • Drinking
  • Drinks made with water
  • Food preparation, washing or cooking of food
  • Brushing teeth
  • Making ice
  • In particular, children under 12 months old should not drink this water.
  • This water should not be used for making up infant formula for bottled fed infants. An alternative source of water should be used. Bottled water can also be used to make up infant formula. All bottled water, with the exception of natural mineral water, is regulated to the same standard as drinking water. It is best not to use bottled water labelled as ‘Natural Mineral Water’ as it can have high levels of sodium (salt) and other minerals, although it rarely does. ‘Natural Mineral Water’ can be used if no other water is available, for as short a time as possible, as it is important to keep babies hydrated.
  • If bottled water is used to make up infant formula it should be boiled once (rolling boil for 1 minute), and cooled in the normal way.
  • Ready-to-use formula that does not need added water can also be used.
  • Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink.
  • Caution should be taken when bathing infants to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water.
  • Discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges.

What can you use mains water for:

  • The water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing, flushing toilets, laundry and washing of utensils.

Irish Water continues to work at this time with our Local Authority partners, contractors and others to safeguard the health and well-being of both staff and the public and to ensure the continuity of critical drinking water and wastewater services.

Irish Water and Meath County Council would like to remind customers supplied by Batterstown Public Water Scheme that the Do Not Consume Notice issued on Thursday 16 September remains in place until further notice.

The Do Not Consume Notice was placed as a precaution to protect approximately 96 customers as a result of a Bromate exceedance in the water supply.

Customers in this area are reminded that the water is not safe for consumption or the preparation of foods, but is safe for hygiene and use in washing machines and dishwashers. It is especially important that mains drinking water is not given to bottle fed infants. Irish Water would like to remind the public to continue to follow public health advice on handwashing and hygiene. 

We would like to reassure our customers that Irish Water’s drinking water compliance and operational experts are working in partnership with Meath County Council to lift the Do Not Consume Notice as quickly and as safely as possible, in consultation and agreement with the HSE. The EPA have been notified of the Do Not Consume Notice.

Please note this is not a Boil Water Notice. Boiling the water will not reduce Bromate levels and is therefore not a suitable measure to make the water safe to consume. This notice does not apply to other areas or water schemes in Co Meath.

Impacted customers have been directly notified.  An alternative water supply is being provided to all customers on an on-going basis and bottled water is being delivered to vulnerable customers who are registered on this supply, in adherence with current HSE advice.

For queries regarding this Do Not Consume Notice, customers should contact Irish Water directly on our customer care helpline, open 24/7, on 1800 278 278. Updates will be available on the Supply and Service Updates section of the our website and via Twitter @IWCare. Customers can also set their location on our website to view local updates specific to their water and wastewater supply.

Michael Cunniffe, Irish Water, said: “Irish Water and Meath County Council understand the inconvenience caused as a result of this Do Not Consume Notice and apologise to all customers affected. Public health is our number one priority and it is important that people adhere to this Do Not Consume Notice. We will continue to work closely with Meath County Council with a view to lifting the notice as quickly and as safely as possible. Irish Water’s priority is the provision of safe, clean drinking water and safeguarding water supply for the future, is a vital focus.” 

Public Health Advice:

This water should NOT be used for:

  • Drinking
  • Drinks made with water
  • Food preparation, washing or cooking of food
  • Brushing teeth
  • Making ice
  • In particular, children under 12 months old should not drink this water.
  • This water should not be used for making up infant formula for bottled fed infants. An alternative source of water should be used. Bottled water can also be used to make up infant formula. All bottled water, with the exception of natural mineral water, is regulated to the same standard as drinking water. It is best not to use bottled water labelled as ‘Natural Mineral Water’ as it can have high levels of sodium (salt) and other minerals, although it rarely does. ‘Natural Mineral Water’ can be used if no other water is available, for as short a time as possible, as it is important to keep babies hydrated.
  • If bottled water is used to make up infant formula it should be boiled once (rolling boil for 1 minute), and cooled in the normal way.
  • Ready-to-use formula that does not need added water can also be used.
  • Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink.
  • Caution should be taken when bathing infants to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water.
  • Discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges.

What can you use mains water for:

  • The water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing, flushing toilets, laundry and washing of utensils. 

Irish Water continues to work at this time with our Local Authority partners, contractors and others to safeguard the health and well-being of both staff and the public and to ensure the continuity of critical drinking water and wastewater services.

Following consultation with the Health Service Executive (HSE), Irish Water issued a Do Not Consume Notice for customers supplied by Batterstown public water supply today, Thursday 16 September 2021. The notice was issued to protect 96 customers following a Bromate exceedance in the water supply.

The water is not safe for consumption or the preparation of foods, but is safe for hygiene and use in washing machines and dishwashers. It is especially important that mains drinking water is not given to bottle fed infants. Irish Water would like to remind the public to continue to follow public health advice on handwashing and hygiene.

We would like to reassure our customers that Irish Water’s drinking water compliance and operational experts are working in partnership with Meath County Council to lift the Do Not Consume Notice as quickly and as safely as possible, in consultation and agreement with the HSE. The EPA have been notified of the Do Not Consume Notice.

Please note this is not a Boil Water Notice. Boiling the water will not reduce Bromate levels and is therefore not a suitable measure to make the water safe to consume. This notice does not apply to other areas or water schemes in Co Meath.

Irish Water is providing an alternative water supply on an on-going basis to impacted customers while we work to resolve this notice.

Impacted customers have been directly notified.  An alternative water supply is being provided to all customers on an on-going basis and bottled water is being delivered to vulnerable customers who are registered on this supply, in adherence with current HSE advice. Vulnerable customers or those who have concerns about leaving their homes during the current pandemic should contact our customer care team, open 24/7, on 1800 278 278.

Michael Cunniffe, Regional Operations Lead with Irish Water, said: “Irish Water acknowledges the impact of this notice on the local community in Batterstown and we would like to reassure impacted customers that our drinking water compliance and operational experts are working to resolve this issue as quickly and as safely as possible. We would ask customers who have concerns to contact our customer care team on 1800 278 278. The water is safe to use for handwashing and personal hygiene and all customers on this water supply scheme should continue to follow public health advice on handwashing at this time.”

Public Health Advice:

This water should NOT be used for:

  • Drinking
  • Drinks made with water
  • Food preparation, washing or cooking of food
  • Brushing teeth
  • Making ice
  • In particular, children under 12 months old should not drink this water.
  • This water should not be used for making up infant formula for bottled fed infants. An alternative source of water should be used. Bottled water can also be used to make up infant formula. All bottled water, with the exception of natural mineral water, is regulated to the same standard as drinking water. It is best not to use bottled water labelled as ‘Natural Mineral Water’ as it can have high levels of sodium (salt) and other minerals, although it rarely does. ‘Natural Mineral Water’ can be used if no other water is available, for as short a time as possible, as it is important to keep babies hydrated.
  • If bottled water is used to make up infant formula it should be boiled once (rolling boil for 1 minute), and cooled in the normal way.
  • Ready-to-use formula that does not need added water can also be used.
  • Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink.
  • Caution should be taken when bathing infants to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water.
  • Discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges.

What can you use mains water for:

  • The water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing, flushing toilets, laundry and washing of utensils.

Further details are available on our Do Not Consume page.

Updates area available on our Water Supply Updates section, on Twitter @IWCare and via our customer care helpline, open 24/7 on 1800 278 278.

Irish Water continues to work at this time with our Local Authority partners, contractors and others to safeguard the health and well-being of both staff and the public and to ensure the continuity of critical drinking water and wastewater services.